Profile

FARQUHAR, Allan
(Service number 6/452)

Aliases Allan Alexander, occasionally
First Rank Private Last Rank Second Lieutenant

Birth

Date 12 November 1893 Place of Birth Pleasant Point

Enlistment Information

Date 14 August 1914 Age 20 years 9 months
Address at Enlistment Fairlie
Occupation Farm labourer
Previous Military Experience Territorials; 2nd South Canterbury Regiment (still serving)
Marital Status Single
Next of Kin Mr J. FARQUHAR (father), Clayton, Fairlie. Later of Poplar Downs, Kimbell
Religion Presbyterian
Medical Information Height 5 feet 11¼ inches. Weight 147 lbs. Chest measurement 33-35½ inches. Complexion dark. Eyes grey. Hair dark brown. Eyes both 6/6. Hearing normal. Colour vision good. Limbs well formed. Full and perfect movement of all joints. Chest well formed. Heart and lungs normal. Teeth good. Free from hernia, varicocele, varicose veins, haemorrhoids, inveterate or contagious skin disease. Vaccinated. Good bodily and mental health. No slight defects.

Military Service

Served with NZ Armed Forces Served in Army
Military District

Embarkation Information

Body on Embarkation Main Body
Unit, Squadron, or Ship Canterbury Infantry Battalion
Date 16 October 1914
Transport Tahiti or Athenic
Embarked From Lyttelton, Canterbury Destination Suez. Egypt
Other Units Served With
Last Unit Served With Canterbury Infantry Regiment

Military Awards

Campaigns Egyptian (Suez Canal); Balkans (Gallipoli); Egyptian Expeditionary Force; Western European (Somme, Messines)
Service Medals 1914-15 Star; British War Medal; Victory Medal
Military Awards Military Cross (MC) 

Award Circumstances and Date

"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in carrying out a recaonnaisance of the enemy's wire defences in bright moonlight. Though continually fired on by machine guns at close range, he reconnoitred the enemy's wire along the whole sector" London Gazette, 5 July 1918, p. 7937. 18 January 1918

Prisoner of War Information

Date of Capture
Where Captured and by Whom
Actions Prior to Capture
PoW Serial Number
PoW Camps
Days Interned
Liberation Date

Discharge

Date Reason

Hospitals, Wounds, Diseases and Illnesses

28 September 1915 - Alexandria - discharged; convalescent. 4 December 1916 - admitted to 7th General Hospital St Omer - slight gastritis. 17 February 1917 - transferred to Convalescent Depot Hornchurch.

Post-war Occupations

Death

Date 24 August 1918 Age 24 yrs
Place of Death Bapaume, France
Cause Killed in action (shot through the heart by a machine gun bullet)
Notices
Memorial or Cemetery Grevillers British Cemetery, Pas-de-Calais, France
Memorial Reference XII A 22
New Zealand Memorials Timaru WarMemorial Wall; Ashwick Flat War Memorial (Lt. A. A. Farquhar, M.C.); Fairlie War Memorial; Fairlie Primary School Memorial; Fairlie School Hall Memorial; Pleasant Point School Memorial; Fairlie Presbyterian Church Roll of Honour.

Biographical Notes

Allan Farquhar was the eldest son of John and Marion (Mareia Marion, née Silvester) Farquhar of Poplar Downs, Kimbell, Canterbury. Born on 12 November 1893 at Pleasant Point, he was baptised on 27 December following by the Pleasant Point Presbyterian Church. Scotsman John Farquhar had gone to Clayton Station, Fairlie, in 1884, firstly as a shepherd, before becoming station manager, for G. I. Hamilton. John Farquhar retired when Mr Hamilton disposed of Clayton. On a bitterly cold night in early June 1919, friends gathered from far and near at Clayton to farewell Mr Farquhar and his family, and to show their esteem and appreciation. Feeling reference was made to the services rendered by his sons in the late war – Allan had laid down his life, Aleck would receive a presentation at the next patriotic social. Mr and Mrs Farquhar and family moved to Poplar Downs at Kimbell. Allan started his schooling at Pleasant Point, where he gained a prize for Standard II proficiency in 1902. From there he moved to Ashwick Flat School for a year then on to Fairlie, where he enjoyed further success – equal in proficiency in Standard IV in 1905, and a prize in Standard VI in 1906, as well as a 1st class attendance prize.

Immediately on the outbreak of war, young territorial Allan Farquhar volunteered his services and passed the medical test. He enlisted on 14 August 1914 at Timaru, aged 20 years 9 months. A farm labourer, single and Presbyterian, he named his father, J. Farquhar, Clayton, Fairlie, as his next-of-kin. Later Mr Farquhar was at Poplar Downs, Kimbell. Allan gave his own address simply as Fairlie. Allan stood at 5 feet 11¼ inches and weighed 147 pounds. Of dark complexion, he had grey eyes and dark brown hair. His sight, hearing and colour vision were all good, as were his limbs, joints, heart, lungs and teeth. He was vaccinated and free of diseases and defects. He was already serving with the Territorials - in the Second South Canterbury Company under commanding officer Captain D. Grant. On 16 October 1914 Private a. Farquhar embarked at Lyttelton, with the Canterbury Infantry Battalion of the Main Body, and reached Egypt on 3 December.

Private Farquhar was present at the action on the Suez Canal, he then took part in the Gallipoli landing, having embarked for the Dardanelles on 12 April 1915. After two months there, he was admitted to the Hospital Ship at Gallipoli, and invalided to hospital at Cairo. The hospital progress report issued in late June 1915 listed Private Allan Farquhar, 6/452, Canterbury Battalion, as sick and admitted to Pont De Kubba Hospital from Gallipoli, on 24 June. He was, however, readmitted to hospital at Cairo in August, transferred to Lady Godley Home at Alexandria in September, then discharged, convalescent, on 28 September 1915. Having recovered, he left Alexandria for the Peninsula again, taking part in the evacuation, where he was one of the rearguard.

When the troops left for France (March 1916), Farquhar held the rank of Lance-Corporal. A few months later he was appointed Temporary Corporal of the 1st Battalion of the Canterbury Infantry Regiment. In France he saw a great deal of fighting in both the Somme and the Messines conflicts. On 19 November 1916 he was admitted to the 1st Australian Casualty Clearing Station and on 4 December 1916 to 7th General Hospital at St Omer, suffering with slight gastritis. He was sent to England, sick, admitted to Walton-on-Thames Hospital on 14 December 1916, and on 17 February 1917 transferred to the Convalescent Depot at Hornchurch. It was after the Somme battle that he received his Sergeant’s stripes. In June 1917, he gained a Lieutenant's commission, the news being conveyed in a letter to his father. Having completed the officer training successfully he was posted to his unit with the rank of Second Lieutenant. Returning to France shortly afterwards, he was there till the time of his death. On 30 June 1917 he left Sling, reported at Folkestone, and proceeded overseas to Etaples, being posted to the 2nd Battalion of the Canterbury Regiment three months later.

In January 1918, 6/452 2nd Lieutenant A. Farquhar was awarded the Military Cross. The citation read – “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in carrying out a reconnaissance of the enemy's wire defences in bright moonlight. Though continually fired on by machine guns at close range, he reconnoitred the enemy's wire along the whole sector.” (London Gazette, 5 July 1918, p. 7937. 18 January 1918).

So soon after this recognition, Lieutenant Farquhar, M.C., was killed in action – on 24 August 1918, at Bapaume, France, aged 24 years. He was buried in Grevillers British Cemetery, Pas-de-Calais, France. Mr John Farquhar, Clayton, received a letter respecting the death of his son from his Company Commander:— “It is with the greatest regret that I write to offer to yourself and family the sincere sympathy of the 2nd Company, officers and men, in the loss of your son, Allan. He was taking part in the attack towards Bapaume on August 24th, and was shot through the heart by a machine gun bullet while leading his men against the enemy, and was killed instantaneously. We buried his body yesterday in a military cemetery about half a mile east of the village of Grevillers. . . . . . . We were able to give Allan a Christian burial, the service being read by the Rev. Mr Cruickshank, our battalion C.E. padre. To-day we have marked his grave with a cross. In your son the company has lost a fine officer and man, one who was universally loved and respected. In the fighting on August 14th, he again distinguished himself, and was recommended for a bar to his Military Cross.”

Allan Farquhar, M.C., saw service in all the fields of major conflict - Suez Canal, Gallipoli, Somme and Messines, and was awarded the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. These, and presumably the Military Cross, were sent to his father, as were the scroll and plaque. John Farquhar acknowledged receipt of the Military Cross awarded to his son in recognition of distinguished and meritorious service in time of war, on 16 October 1919. He had asked that it be presented privately. In February 1919 Mr Farquhar had acknowledged receipt of the Parchment Commission of 6/452 2/Lieut Allan Farquhar (deceased). It was stated that he had made a Will held by J. Farquhar, Clayton. All gratuity was to be forwarded to J. Farquhar, Clayton. Allan had signed his Will on 31 August 1914, as he prepared to serve his country. He bequeathed all his estate to his father absolutely, and named him the sole executor. As Mr Farquhar renounced his right to probate and execution, the Public Trustee effected administration - £154.3s.7d in Post Office Savings Bank and £110.14s in Life Policy. His brother, Gunner Alexander Farquhar, who left with the Tenth Reinforcements, was wounded the second time on September 1, 1918, and was in hospital in England.

Allan Farquhar, M.C., is honoured on the Timaru Memorial Wall, the Ashwick Flat War Memorial, the Fairlie War Memorial; Fairlie Primary School Memorial, Fairlie School Hall Memorial, Pleasant Point School Memorial, and Fairlie Presbyterian Church Roll of Honour. His name is also inscribed on his parents’ headstone in the Fairlie Cemetery, over the plot where his brother Alex was also buried in 1937. Following special intercessory services in connection with war, on Sunday, 8 August 1915 at the Fairlie Presbyterian Church, a Roll of Honour was unveiled and the 31 names on it were read out, that of Allan Farquhar being among them. At the annual meeting of the Ashwick Flat Patriotic Committee, held in May 1919, profound regret was expressed at the loss sustained by the district in the deaths of A. Farquhar and six other men. In his death, the district of Fairlie lost “one of the bravest and most unassuming boys who ever left the district.” The Ashwick Flat Memorial was unveiled in June 1921 in the presence of about 250 people. The National Anthem was sung at the beginning of proceedings, addresses were given by local dignitaries, the hymn “Oh God Our Help in Ages Past” was sung, a prayer of dedication was offered and all gathered joined in the Lord’s Prayer. After the unveiling a piper played “The Flowers of the Forest” and the bugler sounded “The Last Post”. A memorial oak had been planted before the ceremony. Engraved on the west side of this impressive monument are the names of seven men who fell in the Great War, Lieutenant A. A. Farquhar, M.C., being one of them.

A portrait of 2nd Lieutenant Allan Farquhar, in uniform with his Military Cross is held by Archives New Zealand (Archives NZ Archway AALZ 25044 F1130 44). Unfortunately the photograph is badly damaged.

Sources

Auckland War Memorial Museum Cenotaph Database [20 October 2013]; NZ Defence Force Personnel Records (Archives NZ Ref. AABK 18805 W5537 0039021) [30 March 2014]; NZ Defence Force Personnel Records (Archives NZ Ref. AABK 18805 W5568 0135535) [12 August 2015]; CWGC [21 October 2013]; Timaru Herald, 23 December 1902, 18 December 1905, 15 December 1906, 15 August 1914, 10 August 1915, 10 & 15 August 1917, 6 &26 February 1918, 11 September 1918, 28 October 1918, 29 January 1919, 14 & 15 May 1919, 6 June 1919, Sun, 5 September 1914, Press, 30 June 1915, 6 September 1918, Ashburton Guardian, 30 June 1915, New Zealand Times, 29 October 1915, 22 February 1918, Temuka Leader, 11 July 1918, 14 June 1921, Lyttelton Times, 11 September 1918 (Papers Past) [13 March 2014; 05 September 2014; 12 February 2015; 11 August 2015; 05 May 2016; 07 February 2018; 01 July 2019]; School Admission records (South Canterbury Branch NZSG) [2014]; Fairlie Cemetery headstone transcription (South Canterbury Branch NZSG cemetery records) [01 April 2014]; Probate record (Archives NZ/FamilySearch) [24 May 2016]

External Links

Related Documents

Researched and Written by

Teresa Scott, SC branch NZSG

Currently Assigned to

TS

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 Logo. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License unless otherwise stated.

Tell us more

Do you have information that could be added to this story? Or related images that you are happy to share? Submit them here!

Required fields are marked with an asterisk (*).
Your Details
Veteran Details
- you may attach an image or document up to 10MB